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OUR PRACTICE

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OUR PRACTICE

DOCTORS

DR. GRETCHEN CRIST

  • Undergraduate:BS-Tufts University
  • Medical School:MD-Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
  • Residency Training:University of Vermont
  • Entry to Practice:NEP Since 2013
  • Board Certification:Pediatrics DABP, FAAP
“There are three ways to get
something done: do it yourself, hire someone or forbid your kids to do it.”
-Monta Crane

DOCTORS

Dr. Gretchen Crist

From an early age, I knew that I wanted to be a doctor. Growing up in a family with three siblings, I could tell there was something different about me. My brother and sisters were surprised that I wanted to spend hours on summer vacation nursing a tiny abandoned newborn kitten to health by feeding her milk several times a day through a medicine dropper.

In particular, I always wanted to be a pediatrician. I have always loved being around kids and find that there are few things quite as joyful as watching a child grow and discover the world. My true passions in high school were playing on the soccer team and being a nursery school summer camp counselor. I found myself searching for a future that would allow me to spend time interacting with kids and their families, be a part of a team and pursue my interest in science…Pediatrics was a natural choice.

I majored in Biology at Tufts University, where I continued to play soccer. Then I followed my career path to Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. I completed my pediatric residency at the University of Vermont and returned to live in Connecticut with my husband and two children.

I love being a pediatrician, because every day I have the opportunity to share in each family’s experience of their child’s physical and emotional development and have the privilege of helping when they are sick.

  • Undergraduate:BS-Tufts University
  • Medical School:MD-Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
  • Residency Training:University of Vermont
  • Entry to Practice:NEP Since 2013
  • Board Certification:Pediatrics DABP, FAAP
“There are three ways to get
something done: do it yourself, hire someone or forbid your kids to do it.”
-Monta Crane

DOCTORS

DR. ELIZABETH CIPOLLA

  • Undergraduate:BA-Middlebury College
  • Medical School:MPH-London School of Medicine & Hygiene
  • Medical University:MD-University of Vermont
  • Residency Training:New York Medical College
  • Entry to Practice:NEP Since 2014
  • Board Certification:Pediatrics DABP, FAAP
“There are three ways to get
something done: do it yourself, hire someone or forbid your kids to do it.”
-Monta Crane

DOCTORS

Dr. Elizabeth Cipolla

For as long as I can remember I have wanted to be a pediatrician, although my various interests have tested (and confirmed) this desire through the years.

At Middlebury College I took full advantage of a liberal arts education. I graduated with high honors with a BA in Geography and French, while also taking pre-medical science courses. I played on the varsity squash team and also enjoyed hiking the Vermont mountains on weekends. After graduation I went on to receive a Master's of Public Health in London and spent five years in research of widely diverse topics including infectious disease, patient safety, and breastfeeding. As much as I love the science of research, I knew I would love working with children individually even more.

I went back to medical school after my years in public health research with a desire to be a general pediatrician. I studied medicine at the University of Vermont and again loved working with children and their families. I jumped at opportunities for medical outreach with kids of all ages, and I particularly enjoyed teaching health and nutrition at a local elementary school. My residency training was completed at the Maria Fareri Children's Hospital with the New York Medical College. I have developed particular interests in childhood development, nutrition, and adolescent medicine.

I reside in Old Greenwich with my husband and our children. On weekends you'll find us walking Todd's Point, paddle boarding on the Sound, or ferrying children to activities.

I am thrilled to join New England Pediatrics. I look forward to developing long-standing relationships with you and your children for many years to come!
  • Undergraduate:BA-Middlebury College
  • Medical School:MPH-London School of Medicine & Hygiene
  • Medical University:MD-University of Vermont
  • Residency Training:New York Medical College
  • Entry to Practice:NEP Since 2014
  • Board Certification:Pediatrics DABP, FAAP
“There are three ways to get
something done: do it yourself, hire someone or forbid your kids to do it.”
-Monta Crane

 


OUR DOCS


ARE


TOP DOCS
2013
 
Dr. Levine named Top Doc in New York Magazine.
 
Drs. Morelli and Klenk named Top Docs 2013 in Connecticut Magazine
 
Congratulations to Drs. Morelli, Levine and Klenk for being named Top Docs in Castle Connolly again!

Please join us in congratulating Dr. Klenk

on being honored as Stamford Hospital's

Doctor of the Quarter

 

 

NUTRITION AND FITNESS Introducing Baby to Solid Foods
Breast milk or formula is the only food your baby needs until 4 to 6
months of age. At that time you may begin to slowly introduce solid
food. Always begin new foods in the morning and offer only one new
food every 2-3 days. Observe for allergic reactions such as skin
rash, vomiting, diarrhea, irritability or in rare instances, wheezing.

Begin with one tablespoon of iron-fortified rice cereal (Stage I) mixed
with 2-3 tablespoons of breast milk or formula once a day. The
cereal should be thin and runny initially, but gradually thickened as
the baby learns to eat. You may work up to 4-5 tablespoons of rice
cereal per serving over a 2-3 week period, and can then try oatmeal
or barley.

Once your baby is eating cereal without incident, introduce single
ingredient fruits and vegetables. Begin with one tablespoon of each
new food and advance to 3 or 4 tablespoons per serving as the
baby’s appetite increases. You may mix this with the cereal or give
separately. Each feeding should end with breast or bottle feeding,
although the amount of milk may decrease as the amount of solid
food increases. By 6 months of age, most babies will advance to 2
meals per day: cereal plus fruit and vegetable plus fruit.

By 6 to 7 months of age, begin a third meal and add single
ingredient meats. Foods should still be smooth in consistency. Once
all single ingredient (Stage I) foods have been introduced, Stage 2
foods are appropriate to start. Avoid desserts and cobblers which are
full of sugar. If you would like to prepare your own baby food, we
recommend: “Feed Me, I’m Yours” by Bruce Lansky.

By 9 months of age, most babies are ready for more texture (Stage 3), lumpier foods and soft finger foods such as small pieces of ripe fruit or cooked-to-very-tender vegetables. You may begin yogurt, small cubes or shreds of cheese, pastina and scrambled or hardboiled eggs (yolk first, then whole egg). Most babies can also handle teething biscuits, crackers, rice cakes and Cheerios by this age.

Between 9-12 months, you may gradually transition to table foods
(even if no teeth yet!). These should be minced or mashed and
should dissolve easily in the baby’s mouth. Avoid foods like popcorn,
nuts, raisins, grapes, hard raw vegetables and hot dogs as these
may easily cause choking. If there is no family history of food allergy,
you may introduce fish, dairy products, berries and citrus products
after nine months. Otherwise, wait until one year of age to try the
more allergenic foods. The latest recommendation is to avoid peanut
butter and peanut products until age three.

One important aside: once your child is tolerating dairy products, and
you are ready to try whole milk, remember to offer small quantities in
a cup (any type of cup is okay). This early practice will help to ease
the transition from bottle to cup at 12-15 months of age.

Every baby is different and will set his/her own course of feeding. If
s/he seems fussy or turns away, end the feeding and try again at the
next feeding time. You may have to offer certain foods many times
before a baby accepts each one. Always feed your baby sitting up in
an infant seat, highchair or your lap-never lying down!

Allow your baby to partake in the feeding process by leaving his
hands free to “help” and push the spoon and food into his mouth.
Expect a mess but also a delighted baby!
MISSION
Since our founding in 1983, New England Pediatrics strives to provide our patients with the best and most comprehensive pediatric care possible from birth until 22 years of age. We accomplish this through close collaboration between our staff, our patients and their families. Our physicians and nurses are recognized for compassion, experience, knowledge and a commitment to excellence.

  • Rosemary
    Klenk, MD

  • Alan
    Morelli, MD

  • Todd
    Palker, MD

  • Jason
    Davis, MD

  • Elizabeth
    Cipolla, MD

  • Gretchen
    Crist, MD
COLLABORATIVE CARE
The doctors at New England Pediatrics believe that a collaborative approach to caring for children works best. We consider patients in our care to be patients of the practice, not just of one specific doctor. Sharing patient care among all six doctors gives a patient the full advantage of each physician's knowledge, experience and perspective. Our many years in practice have reinforced the value of this model. However, if a parent prefers that their child see a specific physician, we will gladly accommodate that request when scheduling permits.

We believe our physicians are among the finest practicing pediatricians anywhere. All are board-certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and are Fellows of The American Academy of Pediatrics. Our doctors are active participants in many community boards and organizations, as well as Attending Pediatricians at The Stamford Hospital. Equally important, each one has gained the personal wisdom that only parenthood can bestow.

 

THE COMMUNITIES WE SERVE
We care for patients who come from all over Fairfield County and nearby Westchester County. Our Connecticut patients reside in Stamford, New Canaan, Darien, Greenwich, Old Greenwich, Norwalk, Wilton, Weston, Westport, Ridgefield and Redding. New Yorkers hail from Pound Ridge, Bedford, Mount Kisco, Katonah, Armonk, Rye, Port Chester and Lewisboro.

We take pride in the strong relationships we build with patients and families and are pleased that so many patients who live abroad return to New England Pediatrics for yearly check-ups during stateside vacations. In recent years, our proudest moments have been to welcome into our practice the children of patients we first cared for.

DOCTORS

DR. GRETCHEN CRIST

  • Undergraduate:BS-Tufts University
  • Medical School:MD-Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
  • Residency Training:University of Vermont
  • Entry to Practice:NEP Since 2013
  • Board Certification:Pediatrics DABP, FAAP
“There are three ways to get
something done: do it yourself, hire someone or forbid your kids to do it.”
-Monta Crane

DOCTORS

Dr. Gretchen Crist

From an early age, I knew that I wanted to be a doctor. Growing up in a family with three siblings, I could tell there was something different about me. My brother and sisters were surprised that I wanted to spend hours on summer vacation nursing a tiny abandoned newborn kitten to health by feeding her milk several times a day through a medicine dropper.

In particular, I always wanted to be a pediatrician. I have always loved being around kids and find that there are few things quite as joyful as watching a child grow and discover the world. My true passions in high school were playing on the soccer team and being a nursery school summer camp counselor. I found myself searching for a future that would allow me to spend time interacting with kids and their families, be a part of a team and pursue my interest in science…Pediatrics was a natural choice.

I majored in Biology at Tufts University, where I continued to play soccer. Then I followed my career path to Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. I completed my pediatric residency at the University of Vermont and returned to live in Connecticut with my husband and two children.

I love being a pediatrician, because every day I have the opportunity to share in each family’s experience of their child’s physical and emotional development and have the privilege of helping when they are sick.

  • Undergraduate:BS-Tufts University
  • Medical School:MD-Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
  • Residency Training:University of Vermont
  • Entry to Practice:NEP Since 2013
  • Board Certification:Pediatrics DABP, FAAP
“There are three ways to get
something done: do it yourself, hire someone or forbid your kids to do it.”
-Monta Crane

DOCTORS

DR. ELIZABETH CIPOLLA

  • Undergraduate:BA-Middlebury College
  • Medical School:MPH-London School of Medicine & Hygiene
  • Medical University:MD-University of Vermont
  • Residency Training:New York Medical College
  • Entry to Practice:NEP Since 2014
  • Board Certification:Pediatrics DABP, FAAP
“There are three ways to get
something done: do it yourself, hire someone or forbid your kids to do it.”
-Monta Crane

DOCTORS

Dr. Elizabeth Cipolla

For as long as I can remember I have wanted to be a pediatrician, although my various interests have tested (and confirmed) this desire through the years.

At Middlebury College I took full advantage of a liberal arts education. I graduated with high honors with a BA in Geography and French, while also taking pre-medical science courses. I played on the varsity squash team and also enjoyed hiking the Vermont mountains on weekends. After graduation I went on to receive a Master's of Public Health in London and spent five years in research of widely diverse topics including infectious disease, patient safety, and breastfeeding. As much as I love the science of research, I knew I would love working with children individually even more.

I went back to medical school after my years in public health research with a desire to be a general pediatrician. I studied medicine at the University of Vermont and again loved working with children and their families. I jumped at opportunities for medical outreach with kids of all ages, and I particularly enjoyed teaching health and nutrition at a local elementary school. My residency training was completed at the Maria Fareri Children's Hospital with the New York Medical College. I have developed particular interests in childhood development, nutrition, and adolescent medicine.

I reside in Old Greenwich with my husband and our children. On weekends you'll find us walking Todd's Point, paddle boarding on the Sound, or ferrying children to activities.

I am thrilled to join New England Pediatrics. I look forward to developing long-standing relationships with you and your children for many years to come!
  • Undergraduate:BA-Middlebury College
  • Medical School:MPH-London School of Medicine & Hygiene
  • Medical University:MD-University of Vermont
  • Residency Training:New York Medical College
  • Entry to Practice:NEP Since 2014
  • Board Certification:Pediatrics DABP, FAAP
“There are three ways to get
something done: do it yourself, hire someone or forbid your kids to do it.”
-Monta Crane

 


OUR DOCS


ARE


TOP DOCS
2013
 
Dr. Levine named Top Doc in New York Magazine.
 
Drs. Morelli and Klenk named Top Docs 2013 in Connecticut Magazine
 
Congratulations to Drs. Morelli, Levine and Klenk for being named Top Docs in Castle Connolly again!

Please join us in congratulating Dr. Klenk

on being honored as Stamford Hospital's

Doctor of the Quarter

 

 

NUTRITION AND FITNESS Introducing Baby to Solid Foods
Breast milk or formula is the only food your baby needs until 4 to 6
months of age. At that time you may begin to slowly introduce solid
food. Always begin new foods in the morning and offer only one new
food every 2-3 days. Observe for allergic reactions such as skin
rash, vomiting, diarrhea, irritability or in rare instances, wheezing.

Begin with one tablespoon of iron-fortified rice cereal (Stage I) mixed
with 2-3 tablespoons of breast milk or formula once a day. The
cereal should be thin and runny initially, but gradually thickened as
the baby learns to eat. You may work up to 4-5 tablespoons of rice
cereal per serving over a 2-3 week period, and can then try oatmeal
or barley.

Once your baby is eating cereal without incident, introduce single
ingredient fruits and vegetables. Begin with one tablespoon of each
new food and advance to 3 or 4 tablespoons per serving as the
baby’s appetite increases. You may mix this with the cereal or give
separately. Each feeding should end with breast or bottle feeding,
although the amount of milk may decrease as the amount of solid
food increases. By 6 months of age, most babies will advance to 2
meals per day: cereal plus fruit and vegetable plus fruit.

By 6 to 7 months of age, begin a third meal and add single
ingredient meats. Foods should still be smooth in consistency. Once
all single ingredient (Stage I) foods have been introduced, Stage 2
foods are appropriate to start. Avoid desserts and cobblers which are
full of sugar. If you would like to prepare your own baby food, we
recommend: “Feed Me, I’m Yours” by Bruce Lansky.

By 9 months of age, most babies are ready for more texture (Stage 3), lumpier foods and soft finger foods such as small pieces of ripe fruit or cooked-to-very-tender vegetables. You may begin yogurt, small cubes or shreds of cheese, pastina and scrambled or hardboiled eggs (yolk first, then whole egg). Most babies can also handle teething biscuits, crackers, rice cakes and Cheerios by this age.

Between 9-12 months, you may gradually transition to table foods
(even if no teeth yet!). These should be minced or mashed and
should dissolve easily in the baby’s mouth. Avoid foods like popcorn,
nuts, raisins, grapes, hard raw vegetables and hot dogs as these
may easily cause choking. If there is no family history of food allergy,
you may introduce fish, dairy products, berries and citrus products
after nine months. Otherwise, wait until one year of age to try the
more allergenic foods. The latest recommendation is to avoid peanut
butter and peanut products until age three.

One important aside: once your child is tolerating dairy products, and
you are ready to try whole milk, remember to offer small quantities in
a cup (any type of cup is okay). This early practice will help to ease
the transition from bottle to cup at 12-15 months of age.

Every baby is different and will set his/her own course of feeding. If
s/he seems fussy or turns away, end the feeding and try again at the
next feeding time. You may have to offer certain foods many times
before a baby accepts each one. Always feed your baby sitting up in
an infant seat, highchair or your lap-never lying down!

Allow your baby to partake in the feeding process by leaving his
hands free to “help” and push the spoon and food into his mouth.
Expect a mess but also a delighted baby!
MISSION
Since our founding in 1983, New England Pediatrics strives to provide our patients with the best and most comprehensive pediatric care possible from birth until 22 years of age. We accomplish this through close collaboration between our staff, our patients and their families. Our physicians and nurses are recognized for compassion, experience, knowledge and a commitment to excellence.

  • Rosemary
    Klenk, MD

  • Alan
    Morelli, MD

  • Todd
    Palker, MD

  • Jason
    Davis, MD

  • Elizabeth
    Cipolla, MD

  • Gretchen
    Crist, MD
COLLABORATIVE CARE
The doctors at New England Pediatrics believe that a collaborative approach to caring for children works best. We consider patients in our care to be patients of the practice, not just of one specific doctor. Sharing patient care among all six doctors gives a patient the full advantage of each physician's knowledge, experience and perspective. Our many years in practice have reinforced the value of this model. However, if a parent prefers that their child see a specific physician, we will gladly accommodate that request when scheduling permits.

We believe our physicians are among the finest practicing pediatricians anywhere. All are board-certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and are Fellows of The American Academy of Pediatrics. Our doctors are active participants in many community boards and organizations, as well as Attending Pediatricians at The Stamford Hospital. Equally important, each one has gained the personal wisdom that only parenthood can bestow.

 

THE COMMUNITIES WE SERVE
We care for patients who come from all over Fairfield County and nearby Westchester County. Our Connecticut patients reside in Stamford, New Canaan, Darien, Greenwich, Old Greenwich, Norwalk, Wilton, Weston, Westport, Ridgefield and Redding. New Yorkers hail from Pound Ridge, Bedford, Mount Kisco, Katonah, Armonk, Rye, Port Chester and Lewisboro.

We take pride in the strong relationships we build with patients and families and are pleased that so many patients who live abroad return to New England Pediatrics for yearly check-ups during stateside vacations. In recent years, our proudest moments have been to welcome into our practice the children of patients we first cared for.
“There is always one moment in childhood when the door opens and lets the future in”
- Graham Greene

STAY INFORMED

Sign up for email alerts, and our news.
Enter email and click Submit