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NEWBORN GUIDELINES Elimination
We expect newborns to have 5-6 wet diapers in a 24 hour period. This is one way you can tell if your baby is getting enough to eat. There is great variability in the pattern of bowel movements for newborns. As many as 10 stools in a day or as few as one stool every 10 days can be a normal pattern, particularly if an infant is exclusively breast-fed. Do not be concerned about the frequency of stools, as long as they appear soft and easy for the baby to pass. The color of a baby's stool is rarely a problem. Any variation of green (even fluorescent), yellow or brown is acceptable. Call only if you see blood in the stool, chalky white or jet black stools.

Jaundice
Some babies will develop a yellow skin color during the first few days of life. This condition is called jaundice and results from an accumulation of bilirubin in the baby's bloodstream. A certain amount of jaundice is "physiologic" or normal in newborns. If a baby becomes jaundiced in the hospital, we will check a 'bilirubin' level. Depending on the baby's age, if the level reaches a certain value, we begin treatment with phototherapy. If the baby's color does not become more yellow until after discharge, call us to check the bilirubin in the office. Usually, the yellow color disappears on its own by the end of the first week.

Umbilical Cord Care
During diaper changes, use a cotton swab to apply alcohol to the skin around the belly button. Don't be afraid to pick up the cord and clean right where it meets the skin. You can expect the cord to shrivel and fall off within two weeks (occasionally a week or two longer). You can help speed the process by keeping the area dry and exposed to air (fold diaper down below the cord). It is normal to see a small amount of bleeding as the cord separates. You should call us for any of the following: foul odor, red streaky rash or green discharge. Before the cord separates completely, give the baby sponge baths. Once the cord has come off, you may immerse the baby in the bath water.

Circumcision
If your infant son has been circumcised, the tip of the penis may appear swollen and red for a few days after the procedure. You should wash the area with warm water using a cotton ball or soft wash cloth, and apply a thin layer of Vaseline or A & D ointment to the tip for the first 3-4 days. A layer of yellowish tissue may form on the surface of the tip of the penis as it heals. This is the normal healing process.

If your son is uncircumcised, no special care of the area other than normal cleansing is necessary. It is normal for the foreskin to adhere firmly to the tip of the penis. This will change as the child grows.

Female infants may appear to have a "period" during the first few days after birth. A small amount of blood may appear in the vagina or on the diaper. This normal occurrence happens because the baby has been separated from her mother's estrogen stores.
NEWBORN GUIDELINES Elimination
We expect newborns to have 5-6 wet diapers in a 24 hour period. This is one way you can tell if your baby is getting enough to eat. There is great variability in the pattern of bowel movements for newborns. As many as 10 stools in a day or as few as one stool every 10 days can be a normal pattern, particularly if an infant is exclusively breast-fed. Do not be concerned about the frequency of stools, as long as they appear soft and easy for the baby to pass. The color of a baby's stool is rarely a problem. Any variation of green (even fluorescent), yellow or brown is acceptable. Call only if you see blood in the stool, chalky white or jet black stools.

Jaundice
Some babies will develop a yellow skin color during the first few days of life. This condition is called jaundice and results from an accumulation of bilirubin in the baby's bloodstream. A certain amount of jaundice is "physiologic" or normal in newborns. If a baby becomes jaundiced in the hospital, we will check a 'bilirubin' level. Depending on the baby's age, if the level reaches a certain value, we begin treatment with phototherapy. If the baby's color does not become more yellow until after discharge, call us to check the bilirubin in the office. Usually, the yellow color disappears on its own by the end of the first week.

Umbilical Cord Care
During diaper changes, use a cotton swab to apply alcohol to the skin around the belly button. Don't be afraid to pick up the cord and clean right where it meets the skin. You can expect the cord to shrivel and fall off within two weeks (occasionally a week or two longer). You can help speed the process by keeping the area dry and exposed to air (fold diaper down below the cord). It is normal to see a small amount of bleeding as the cord separates. You should call us for any of the following: foul odor, red streaky rash or green discharge. Before the cord separates completely, give the baby sponge baths. Once the cord has come off, you may immerse the baby in the bath water.

Circumcision
If your infant son has been circumcised, the tip of the penis may appear swollen and red for a few days after the procedure. You should wash the area with warm water using a cotton ball or soft wash cloth, and apply a thin layer of Vaseline or A & D ointment to the tip for the first 3-4 days. A layer of yellowish tissue may form on the surface of the tip of the penis as it heals. This is the normal healing process.

If your son is uncircumcised, no special care of the area other than normal cleansing is necessary. It is normal for the foreskin to adhere firmly to the tip of the penis. This will change as the child grows.

Female infants may appear to have a "period" during the first few days after birth. A small amount of blood may appear in the vagina or on the diaper. This normal occurrence happens because the baby has been separated from her mother's estrogen stores.
“ No matter how old a mother
is, she watches her middle aged children for signs of
improvement.”
— Florida Scott-Maxwell
INFECTION CONTROL Everyone who handles a newborn infant should wash hands before touching the baby. This is the single most effective way to lessen exposure to infection. Teach siblings who want to touch the baby to pat the feet. You may take the baby outdoors as soon as mother is ready to be up and about (careful—no direct sun exposure). We recommend that during the first six weeks only close family members handle the baby, and that you do not visit families with small children who are sick.